Carter Park Mural Public Art Project

Carter Park Public Art Mural

Project award

The volunteer jury met the on evening of May 21, 2014 to review the six short-listed submissions in terms of technical issues, artistic excellence, response to context, public consultation results and in response to the competition goal and themes. After much discussion Bryce Huffman’s proposal was awarded the highest score.

Background

This report is an overview of the discussion and decision of the volunteer citizen jury which met on the evening of May 21, 2014 to determine which of the six short-listed artists’ proposals for a mural in Carter Park should be implemented. They reviewed the submissions in terms of technical issues, artistic excellence, response to context, public consultation results and in response to the following competition goal and themes:

Goal: That the proposed art work should be vibrant and welcoming as well as provide a sense of space and depth to help minimize the negative effects of the large concrete structure of the Claremont Access on the park.

Themes: The subject of the mural should be reflective of an aspect of one or more of the following themes: 

  • The rich history of the park and Stinson Neighbourhood 
  • The natural character of the park 
  • A sense of a community in transition through gathering, youth and recreation. 

Award

After a great deal of discussion about various aspects of the short-listed proposals and most specifically about the Bryce Huffman and Bruno Capolongo proposals the jury assigned the highest score to the proposal by Bryce Huffman. The commission for the work will therefore be awarded to Bryce Huffman. 

Jury comments

The jury members applauded the efforts of all of the thirty-one artists that made submissions to the competition. There were many excellent proposals. Opening personal ideas and talents to public scrutiny can be difficult and the jury therefore extended their thanks to all of the artists that shared their ideas by submitting to this competition, especially those making their first submission to a public art competition.

The jury also noted the large response to public consultation on this project. They extended their thanks to all 750 people that took the time to review the short-listed submissions and provide their opinions and comments.

Given the large number of high quality submissions, the decision as to which six to short list and to select the single winning proposal was very challenging. The following comments outline the jury’s discussion for the six short-listed proposals: 

Bryce Huffman 
The jury felt that this proposal most successfully addressed the project goal and all of the project themes in a playful and colourful way. Its playful character will appeal to area youth and responds well to the recreation and play areas that are important and well used parts of the park. The work also addresses the natural and historical character of the area through the depiction of urban animals and the tower of the Hamilton Collegiate Institute. It was well received by the community during public consultation. The jury did have minor concerns about the accuracy of the depiction of the Hamilton Collegiate Institute tower and requested that the artist incorporate features in the final mural that better recall the detail of the historic building. Overall the jury felt that this was the best response to the project and therefore scored it highest.

The Gateway, Bruno Capolongo with Ed Kowalski 
The jury commented that this was the most ambitious and technically difficult of the murals proposed, obviously created by talented and skilled artists. They noted that this work also responded best to the goal of the project to provide a sense of space and depth. While the proposal very successfully posits a serene and calm vision that extends the natural character of the park, it may not have addressed other aspects of the project goal and themes as successfully. Some members of the jury and the public thought that it was not as vibrant as other proposals. There was also concern that the serene and peaceful character of the mural would be at odds with the recreational use in the park such as the basketball court located directly in front of it. It was also noted that a basketball net and backboard will be located a couple of metres in front of the illusionary gateway and may take away from the effect of the work. Although the proposal was well received by the public and received high artistic excellence scores it was scored slightly lower than the winning proposal in terms of its response to context due to the concerns with the basketball court. 

Kathleen O’Hagen with Michael Christie and Daniel Seagrave/ Portman Art 
Both of these artists proposals were scored well for addressing the goals and themes of the competition but were not as well received as the by the public. They were therefore not scored 
as highly as the previous two proposals.

Lesia Mokrycke and Jeff Mann 
Both of these artists proposed bold visions that reflected very well one aspect of the goal or a theme of the competition. They were therefore scored highly for artistic excellence. They were 
not as well received during public consultation and were therefore scored lower in regards to the competition themes and consultation than the other proposals. 

The jury

  • Brian Goodman - Stinson Resident 
  • Erika Morton - Stinson Community Association 
  • Jocelyn McKeown - Arts Professional/Stinson Resident 
  • Karen Logan - City of Hamilton Arts Advisory Commission 
  • Linda Quest - Stinson Resident (partial attendance) 
  • Ralph Meiers - Stinson Community Association 
  • Tor Lukasik-Foss - Artist, author and former Hamilton public art competition winner 

Public Consultation took place from April 1 through April 25, 2014 via the City of Hamilton website and at Central Memorial Recreation Center.

750 people provided their preferred selection as follows:

  • 39% for The Gateway (Artist: Bruno Capolongo)
  • 32% for Bryce Huffman
  • 12% for Kathleen O’Hagan
  • 10% for Daniel Seagrave
  • 5% for Lesia Mokrycke
  • 1% for Jeff Mann
  • 1% for None

Review the Public Consultation Comments (PDF, 187 KB)

Call for artists

The Call for Artists closed on March 7, 2014. The City of Hamilton received 33 submissions and would like to thank the artists who made proposals to this competition.

Focus group

A focus group was held on February 13, 2013 to help define the qualities, characteristics, and stories of Carter Park and the Stinson Neighbourhood that should be the subject of the public art mural in the park.

February 13, 2013 from 7 to 8:30 pm
Central Memorial Recreation Centre

Attendees

  • Brian Goodman - Stinson Resident 
  • Katherine Dymkowski - Stinson Resident 
  • Ralph Meiers - Stinson Resident 
  • Erika Morton - Stinson Resident 
  • Ken Coit - Facilitator City of Hamilton, Art in Public Places Coordinator 

Regrets:

  • Linda Quest
  • Lucio Barcaroli

Background

Ken Coit made a short presentation outlining the City’s public art process and examples of goals and themes presented to artists for other public art competitions. 

Discussion

The following question was presented to the group: 
What are the qualities, characteristics and stories of Carter Park and the Stinson Neighbourhood that you think should be the subject of a public art mural in the Park?

The following comments were provided in relation to the overall neighbourhood:

  • Stinson has a rich history as represented by the large amount of beautiful and significant Victorian architecture throughout the neighbourhood. 
  • Stinson is a diverse neighbourhood both economically and culturally 
  • The neighbourhood is transforming and looking toward the future 
  • Stinson is a welcoming inclusive neighbourhood 

The following comments were made in relationship to the park:

  • Should be appealing to youth and should encourage play in the park. (A community youth art project is already being planned to paint the building in the park) 
  • The Claremont access does not contribute to the quality of the park and is seen as physically dividing the neighbourhood. Any art work should minimize its’ impact on the park. 
  • The park has a beautiful character due to the mature trees 
  • The proposed location of the mural on the Claremont access abutment wall is a very prominent location in the neighbourhood that can act as a gateway to the neighbourhood. 

Priorities

After discussion it was generally agreed that the following would be included as direction and information for the artists in the Call for Artists document. 

1. A short history of the neighbourhood and the park itself, including the fact the it was originally a site with houses, the adjacent Central Collegiate Institute fire, the construction of the Claremont Access and the story behind the park’s name 

2. That the proposed art work should be vibrant and welcoming as well as provide a sense of space and depth to help minimize the negative effects of the large concrete structure of the Claremont Access on the park. 

3. The subject of the mural should be reflective of an aspect of one or more of the following themes: 

  • The rich history of the park and Stinson Neighbourhood 
  • The natural character of the park 
  • A sense of a community in transition through gathering, youth and recreation.

Contact us

Ken Coit - Program Manager Public Art and Projects
Tourism & Culture Division, City of Hamilton
28 James Street North
Phone: 905-546-2424 ext. 6281
Email: ken.coit@hamilton.ca