Urban Design & Architecture Awards 2015 Winners

2015 Award winners

The City received 35 submissions (PDF, 6 MB) from architects, urban designers, planners, landscape architects, owners and University students. Each submission was evaluated by a volunteer jury consisting of design professionals and local stakeholders. 

View an interactive map showing locations of all the past winners of Hamilton’s Urban Design and Architecture Awards.

The categories for the 2015 awards program included:

  • Architecture
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • Civic Generosity
  • Community Planning
  • Heritage Restoration
  • Placemaking
  • Precinct Planning
  • Student Work
  • Urban Design
  • Urban Generation

The awards were presented to the owners and design teams at a gala reception held at the Art Gallery of Hamilton on Thursday, November 12, 2015 in celebration of World Town Planning Day.

Award recipients

This year 16 projects received awards within 10 categories:

Project Description
Brownfield sites in Canada should play a greater role in the future development of post-industrial cities within the rust belt. If unproductive, these spaces have no benefit to the city’s economic future. The industrial lands along the Hamilton Harbour defined Hamilton’s economy and cultural identity as a blue-collar city for more than a century.

The project “Steelcity Living” seeks to set a precedent to transform this brownfield site into a vibrant mixed-use community with affordable housing enriched by the remediation and preservation of the site’s industrial past. This community integrates parks and open spaces around the former steel mills. The project applies research and population demographic data to justify housing typologies suited to the adaptive re-use of the former industrial buildings. The study promotes the use of prefabricated housing modules that can be stacked within the former industrial structures. 

2015 UDAA Winner - Steelcity Living

Recipient: Desirae Cronsberry, Master of Architecture Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, Carleton University

Jury Comments
This project reveals a number of thought-provoking ideas about the future of the brownfield lands stretched along Hamilton's Harbour. The Jury was impressed by the degree and detail that this student project took in elaborating upon the utility of these lands, remediation, the supply of affordable housing, and the adaptive re-use of massive buildings on the site.

The Jury recognized not only the extensive research, but also the eye-catching graphics and simulations created by this student in illustrating these ideas. The vivid imagery of large industrial buildings acting as a protective shell for many micro-buildings is quite innovative and would reduce the potential waste from dismantling these enormous structures.

The Jury encourages the submission of more student projects in the future. These projects soar high and offer fresh ideas that are not encumbered by regulations and restrictions. The Jury recommends that the City build stronger relationships with students, by inviting them to lend new ideas and creative solutions to City builders. 

Project Description
The Barton-Tiffany area is a brownfield site that is 26 hectares in size. It provides a significant opportunity for urban regeneration by infusing new activity within the area.  The site also faces many design challenges, given the context of a disconnected waterfront, an abutting rail marshalling yard, and brownfield constraints from past industrial activities.

The West Harbour Secondary Plan required the completion of an Urban Design Study prior to development of the lands.  The result is a compact, mixed-use community integrated into the broader city with a comprehensive transportation network. The study promotes placemaking features in the form of parks, plazas, streetscapes, and low and medium rise built form.  

The project was a design-led exercise that wove supporting studies into the final recommendations. These lands provide significant opportunities for urban regeneration by infusing new life into the area and building upon the proximity to the West Harbour GO station and the  waterfront. Community facilitation was integral to the creation of the study, which guided the built form and massing, parkland, streetscapes, and transportation options.   

2015 UDAA Winner - Barton-Tiffany Urban Design Study

Recipients:

  • City of Hamilton, Planning and Economic Development Department, Community Planning Section
  • GSP Group
  • Diamond Schmitt Architects
  • Paradigm Transportation Solutions
  • MTE Consultants Inc.
  • HGC Engineering
  • EHL Harrison Consulting Inc.

Jury Comments
Projects such as the Barton-Tiffany Urban Design Study promote a highly innovative approach that knits this former industrial area into the fabric of the surrounding community. The new community is integrated into the surrounding neighbourhood with its network of streets and public spaces.

The Jury praises the balanced approach of promoting a modest scale of development that will not siphon up density within one area. The study envisons a low-rise and mid-rise form of mixed use, transit-oriented development planned around a network of high quality pedestrian oriented streetscapes and public spaces. The Jury also acknowledges the approach by the City to provide an extensive public engagement program.

Project Description
The King William Performing Arts District Study proposes to create an integrated, mixed-use performance district centered on Theatre Aquarius. The project aim is to demonstrate how a mixture of performing arts spaces, supported by commercial and residential land uses, could form a district that would bring vibrancy to Hamilton’s Downtown. The urban design component of the study proposes the redevelopment of under-utilized lands and envisions mixed-use developments and lively streetscapes with theatrical facilities along the street edges.

Encouraged by Theatre Aquarius, the district would be a catalyst for a wide range of businesses that cater to the performing arts scene, making this area a dynamic and sustainable community.

The Performing Arts District would also relate to the James Street North art scene and other areas of the Downtown. This district complements the Downtown in a variety of ways, attracting people to the area for entertainment, housing, and business.

2015 UDAA Winner - King William Performing Arts  District Study

Recipients:

  • Theatre Aquarius
  • Civicplan
  • dpai - David Premi Architects Inc.

Jury Comments
The Jury applauds this ambitious proposal commissioned by a theatre company to create a study which features a strong urban design component that imagines a performing arts district in Hamilton where none exists. The study promotes an approach that is intentionally extraverted, as it seeks to tie a future performing arts district into the nearby art scene of James Street North. The study represents another catalyst for the renewal of the Downtown.

Project Description
As one of Hamilton's most iconic and historically rich landscapes, this park was designed in the 1920’s by Landscape Architects Dunnington-Grubb (early founders of the profession of Landscape Architecture in Canada). This 28 hectare City park required substantial restoration and preservation of significant features to ensure the unique character and historical integrity of the park is well maintained for future generations.

The restoration included the reconstruction of the 1927 feature fountain and reflecting pool. The park was upgraded with the installation of new mechanical systems, LED lighting fixtures, and plant material. Personal safety and comfort was enhanced by improving sightlines, illumination, and improved park attractions. It was necessary to integrate storm water management measures and use innovative low-impact techniques without altering or impacting the Park's design intent. Restoration materials included brick and stone that maintained the architectural features of the park. Finally, a new bicycle pump track was installed to attract new visitors to the park. 

2015 UDAA Winner - Gage Park Fountain and Park Restoration

Address: 1000 Main Street East, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • City of Hamilton, Public Works Department, Landscape Architectural Services
  • DTAH Limited
  • Steven Burgess Architect Ltd.
  • Seferian Design Group
  • Landscape Planning Limited
  • Alpine Bike Parks Canada Inc.

Jury Comments
The Jury congratulates the approach taken by the design team to both restore this historic park and make repairs to the functional systems of the park. The restoration respects the historical design intent of the park yet provides new elements to broaden its appeal. 

Large historic parks are an important public amenity in dense urban areas. Gage Park stands out as a green gem in contrast with the built form that surrounds the park. The Jury stresses the importance of sustaining adequate public investments in these parks to both preserve their important historic elements and to allow these parks to evolve to be relevant to new generations of visitors.

Project Description
Conceived as a “Public Square” in 1999 by the former Township of Glanbrook, this parkette is located at the main intersection in the Binbrook community core, and serves as a focal point for the community. The parkette was completed after ten years of planning and public consultation.

The design celebrates the connection of the community to its agricultural roots. The landform is designed to mimic the subtle undulations in the topography of the area. Bands of earth-toned concrete represent the furrows of farmers fields and a circular gathering space represents manmade forms juxtaposed with the landscape. This space accommodates events for the growing community and is a potential site for a significant public art piece.

2015 UDAA Winner - Binbrook Parkette

Address: Highway 56 and Binbrook Road, Glanbrook
Recipients:

  • City of Hamilton Planning and Economic Development Department Urban Renewal Section
  • Adesso Design Inc.
  • MTE Consultants Inc.
  • Caird-Hall Construction Inc.
  • Modern Ornamental Iron Works Limited

Jury Comments
The Jury appreciates lofty placemaking ambition that is realized by this parkette. This space offers the surrounding community of Binbrook with a much needed public space, a destination in the community's core for people to meet, socialize and gather for special events.

The landscape architectural design of the parkette incorporates a number of well-executed landscape elements that promote community identity by echoing characteristic features of Binbrook. As the surrounding area is built up, this space can evolve into the heart of the community, by incorporating public art and hosting community events.

Project Description
The CIBC Breast Assessment Centre consists of a repurposed building and an addition of an entrance pavilion for breast cancer screening and diagnostic services. The building was designed using principles of salutogenesis which promotes environments that support healing and well-being for clients, visitors, and families. The Centre is one of the first in North America to emphasize emotional and physical health through environmental design.

The centre's feature pavilion is set back from Concession Street and nestled into the landscape to create a welcoming but low-key arrival area. A walkway flanked by an allée of trees provides human scale and comfort, and beyond the entrance, visitors find a walled garden with seating.

The exterior of the building uses materials that respond to the emotional quality of the design. The pavilion features wooden slats designed to filter light through the glass, into the main waiting area.

2015 UDAA Winner - CIBC Breast Assessment Centre - Juravinski Hospital

Address: 711 Concession Street, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • Hamilton Health Sciences
  • Zeidler Partnership Architects
  • Al Regehr Landscape Architect
  • Exp Services Inc.
  • MTE Consultants Inc.

Jury Comments
The Jury admires the design of the entry pavilion and its surrounding gardens. The design of the building and the complementing spaces embodies both beauty and elegance in all aspects of the executed work. The detailing of the pavilion and its use of materials and colours is of the highest design quality.

The design creates a cloistered space defined by tall concrete walls that enclose the gardens and the pavilion to create an inviting, comfortable, and reassuring environment. It is clear how both the building and the landscape were designed to contribute positively to healing through the use of soft and warm materials enriched by views of the garden.

Project Description
Originally built in 1939 for Jack Hambly by architect Edward Glass, the house is one of a handful of Art Moderne houses in Ontario.

The Hambly House underwent a comprehensive restoration with the addition of a second storey wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glass and a dining area and porch on the ground floor.

The renovation and addition is sympathetic with the character of the original residence, and is currently on the Hamilton’s municipal register of Properties of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest.

2015 UDAA Winner - Hambly House

Address: 170 Longwood Road North, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • Lane Dunlop and Tina Fetner
  • David Premi Architects Inc.
  • Vanderwesten Rutherford Mantecon
  • Ian McGregor Pools and Landscapes

Jury Comments
The Jury commends the sensitive design approach taken with the addition to this unique historical building. Adding to existing buildings is at best a complex endeavour which can be made more difficult if the building is of a unique architectural style such as the Hambly House.

The Jury congratulates the design team for taking this distinctive approach, which largely maintains the architectural integrity of the original house. The addition appears weightless due to the use of a glass curtain wall featuring minimal divisions between glass panels. The addition seems to flow out of the building and resembles a glass lantern. The corner panels are curved to mimic the lines of the ground floor, a design gesture that helps anchor the house on this corner property.

The expanses of glass on the upper floor contrasts with the solid materials of the main floor. In this way, the upper floor addition is visually understated. This approach is unique and should be celebrated. The designers chose to create an addition that does not visually dominate the original house and property. As such, this project is an example of understated elegance.

Project Description
The landscaping at the John Howard Society building has become a landmark for the neighbourhood and a symbol of further investment and beautification to come.

The Society's mission is to provide effective, just and humane responses to the causes and consequences of crime through various programs and support services. The John Howard Society wanted to provide a welcoming and supportive space that has a sense of respect and dignity for their clients, who are often marginalized and live in poverty.

The design consists of a patio with seating areas that are framed by large wooden planters that provide a sense of enclosure. Metal trellises and canopies provide shade, complemented by trees, flowering plants and ornamental grasses that create visual interest and softness to this urban space.

2015 UDAA Winner - John Howard Society Landscaping

Address: 645 Barton Street East, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • The John Howard Society
  • PMA Landscape Architects
  • TCA | Thier + Curran Architects Ltd.
  • Escape Designs

Jury Comments
The Jury identifies the significant gesture of civic generosity made by this project. The Jury is moved by the effort of the John Howard Society to create a positive space where their clients can feel welcomed and comfortable. Although the beautification of the backyard and street edge was constructed with a limited budget, it provides an immense impact. This noteworthy gesture contributes to the greater community, as it seeks to socially integrate clients into broader society.

Project Description
The North End Free Library and Public Bench is a private initiative that promotes the sharing and exchange of books in the North End neighbourhood.

This tactical urbanism action is a 'take a book, leave a book' gathering place. It is a civic gesture and public amenity that blurs the lines between public and private. It creates community and celebrates literacy in Hamilton's North End neighbourhood.

The design consists of a bench constructed of wooden slats on a sculpted steel frame that supports a suspended wooden box that features a cast resin window which comprises the library. Embracing the city's steelmaking heritage, the supporting steel frame is unfinished and raw, left with all the mill, tool and fabrication marks.

2015 UDAA Winner - North End Free Library and Public Bench

Address: 56 Macaulay Street West, Hamilton
Owners: Bill Curran and Maryanne Scime

Jury Comments
The Jury is impressed with this unique and refreshing intervention by a private home owner. This project is an affirmation that streets are primarily public spaces which are meant to foster interaction between people as they conduct their lives.

The combination of a free library and a bench is in itself a unique creation that appears to be directly aimed at creating relationships between neighbours, passersby, and visitors.  

The Jury recognises this project as an excellent example of Civic Generosity as people are invited to borrow a book, sit and read, or linger and talk with a friend. The Library and Bench is a lasting work that can evolve over time and become a landmark on Macaulay Street.

Project Description
541 Eatery and Exchange is a renovation to an existing century old bank building located in Barton Village. Previously converted to apartment units, the building fell into disrepair for many years and was eventually sold.

The new owners have transformed this building into a socially conscious café that is welcoming, accessible and beautiful. The café offers affordable, fresh, homemade meals at a low cost. The restaurant uses “internal currency'' in the form of buttons, for those who choose to buy a meal for another.

The development includes the preservation of the ornate exterior of the building and the renovation of the ground floor into a café with office space on the second floor. As a charitable organization, 541 Eatery and Exchange provide a welcoming safe place where people can dine and engage with one another.

2015 UDAA Winner - 541 Eatery and Exchange

Address: 541 Barton Street East, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • Drew Hauser
  • McCallum Sather Architects
  • Seguin Engineering Inc.

Jury Comments
The Jury praises the adaptive reuse of this former bank building into a socially minded eatery. It creates a beacon along Barton Street East and the surrounding evolving neighbourhoods. The redevelopment of this building could have gone a number of ways; however, the owners and designers chose the lofty goal of creating a welcoming dining experience for the community. It is a place where people can get together to talk, eat and exchange ideas.  In this way, the restaurant has a vital impact by creating an important public relationship that attracts people to Barton Village. It is helping to transform this street one shop window at a time.

The Jury appreciates the exterior restoration of the elegant bank façades which maintain the architectural integrity of the original building. The restored façades are complemented by tasteful choices such as black framed windows, discreet splashes of colours, and chic signage.  

Project Description
Dundas District High School was built in 1929 and designed by Hamilton architect William J. Walsh in the Collegiate Gothic style. The school closed in 2007, at which point conversion of the property to residential condominiums began.

This restoration and conversion required a number of challenging upgrades such as environmental measures, extensive tree and shrub planting to enhance the forested edge of the property, enhanced flood control at the base of the Spencer Creek Waterfall, and permeable paving in the parking areas. The façades were carefully restored to their original splendour along with a variety of fine stone details and carvings such as gothic style ornaments, gargoyles, pinnacles and decorative crests.  

The conversion also required implementing heritage conservation measures for the front and side façades to preserve the appearance of these façades. Private balconies were sensitively located at the rear of the property to avoid altering the architectural character of the protected façades, and provide residents with breathtaking views of the Niagara Escarpment.

2015 UDAA Winner - Dundas District LoftsAddress: 397 King Street West, Dundas
Recipients:
  • Valvasori Properties
  • KNY Architects
  • IBI Group

Jury Comments
The Jury was presented with two adaptive reuse developments of former schools that have been converted into residential condominiums. The two school projects share similar stories that tell of the bravery and passion of their owners and the level of ingenuity required to transform these buildings into marketable residential projects. On the other hand, the two schools are also quite distinct from each other in many ways including architecturally, geographically, marketability, culturally, and financially.

The Jury distinguishes the Dundas District Lofts for the sophisticated design approach taken to transform the school into high-end residential units. The owners overcame significant hurdles by employing a variety of creative engineering solutions. This project succeeded since it was driven by the passion and vision of the project owners and their design team who addressed a variety of challenges and complex site conditions. What results is an exemplary project perched above Dundas with excellent views of the escarpment, the local downtown, and the Valley.  

Project Description
Located in the Stinson Neighbourhood, the Stinson School was designed by the Hamilton architect Alfred W. Peene and built in 1884. In 1914, an addition was constructed south of the school and later in 1959; a gymnasium was added between the two buildings.

The building was purchased in 2009 for conversion into residential condominiums. The conversion required the construction of an addition to unite the two buildings on the site. This modern addition was designed to be architecturally distinct, allowing the two heritage structures to maintain their visual identities. Further, the addition was designed to emphasize the visual prominence of the original school buildings by using dark materials and glass.

The renovations to the school buildings included a host of new mechanical systems and elevators that were carefully knit into the fabric of the building without significantly altering the heritage and architectural character.

2015 UDAA Winner - Stinson School Lofts
Address: 200 Stinson Street, Hamilton
Recipients:
  • Stinson School Inc.
  • ICON Architects Inc.
  • Lintack Architects Incorporated
  • Kent Rawson Architect
  • Adesso Design Inc.

Jury Comments
Much like the previously mentioned school conversion project, the Stinson School is a remarkable example of pioneering spirit, bravery, passion and ingenuity required to complete a project of this magnitude. This development began during the last economic crisis and was seen at the time as a large scale investment in a transitional neighbourhood. The Jury was enthused to learn about the significant positive impact this development continues to create for this neighbourhood.

This project is an excellent example of the kind of commitment and stamina needed to achieve a conversion of such high calibre faced with a variety of challenging conditions. The Jury congratulates the outstanding achievement and excellence in adaptive re-use of this former school site into residential condominiums.

Project Description
This project is an adaptive re-use of a notable historic building into a performing arts centre and affordable housing for artists. The renovation of the building stripped away the previous metal cladding, and revealed a distinctive brick façade with large windows facing the Gore. This renovation is intended to be a catalyst of Hamilton's Gore Park area in the Downtown.

With a limited budget, this bold renovation pays attention to inspirational elements and touchstones for the artistic community which it houses. Whimsy, warmth, uncommon touches and bold colours allowed this project to transcend the ordinary, making this an affordable home for artists in Hamilton.

From King Street, visitors are greeted by a new two storey storefront of glass and faceted metal panels that provides a delineation from the restored masonry above. The angled and sculpted metal storefront is deeply recessed to create visual emphasis and provides a placemaking element on the streetscape. The large Brazilian cherry pivot door of the arts centre entrance includes custom pulls that add another strong design feature.

2015 UDAA Winner - 541 Eatery and ExchangeArts Centre and Lofts

Address: 95 King Street East, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • CityHousing Hamilton
  • TCA | Their + Curran Architects Ltd.
  • Maitland Spencer Engineering Ltd.
  • Copa Engineering Ltd.
  • Fortech Engineering Ltd.

Jury Comments
The buildings facing Gore Park are being reclaimed, restored, and reused. This important effort is bringing people and businesses back to the Downtown and creating a momentum of change in Hamilton. The Jury applauds the renovation of this important historic façade facing Gore Park. With its limited budget, this project has done more with less, achieving excellent design results and a high impact adding another attractive destination in the Downtown. The design expertly blends new architectural elements with the old building fabric. The project enlivens the streetscape both during the day and at night bringing vitality to the Gore.

Project Description
123 James Street North is a new office and retail building located in the heart of the James Street North arts district. The site was once the home of the Tribune newspaper and more recently functioned as a surface parking lot.

This new 3 storey building is designed to fit into James Street North and contribute to the heritage character of the streetscape. As a corner building, it is highly visible from two streets. The design features a distinctive glass tower that anchors the building to the corner and the use of high quality exterior materials. The ground floor features large windows that promote interaction and vibrancy with the streetscape, both day and night. The second and third floors of the building provide office space which attracts employment uses to the Downtown and complements a wide variety of businesses in the area.

2015 UDAA Winner - 123 James Street North, Hamilton

Address: 123 James Street North, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • J. Beume Real Estate
  • Lintack Architects Incorporated
  • Webb Planning Consultants
  • Strik, Baldinelli, Moniz
  • El-Hamzawi Engineering Ltd.
  • Fortech Engineering Ltd.

Jury Comments
The Jury praises this project's excellence that is achieved by infilling a significant parcel of land along the James Street North streetscape. This development adds to the momentum of change happening along James Street North by providing a building that respects the heritage character of the street.

The Jury commends how the architectural design of the building responds to the horizontal and vertical proportions of the adjacent buildings in this heritage character area. The use of brick compliments the existing building materials common to the street, while the addition of large glassed shop windows along the ground floor opens up these spaces to the streetscape. The built form anchors the corner location with a tower feature and entrance that wraps the architectural quality of the James Street North façade around Vine Street. 

Project Description
This project is an adaptive re-use of a notable historic building into a performing arts centre and affordable housing for artists. The renovation of the building stripped away the previous metal cladding, and revealed a distinctive brick façade with large windows facing the Gore. This renovation is intended to be a catalyst of Hamilton's Gore Park area in the Downtown.

With a limited budget, this bold renovation pays attention to inspirational elements and touchstones for the artistic community which it houses. Whimsy, warmth, uncommon touches and bold colours allowed this project to transcend the ordinary, making this an affordable home for artists in Hamilton.

From King Street, visitors are greeted by a new two storey storefront of glass and faceted metal panels that provides delineation from the restored masonry above. The angled and sculpted metal storefront is deeply recessed to create visual emphasis and provides a placemaking element on the streetscape. The large Brazilian cherry pivot door of the arts centre entrance includes custom pulls that add another strong design feature.

2015 UDAA Winner - Empire TimesAddress: 42-45 King William Street, Hamilton
Recipients:

  • Core Urban Inc.
  • Lintack Architects Incorporated
  • Strik, Baldinelli, Moniz
  • Weekes Engineering

Jury Comments
The buildings facing Gore Park are being reclaimed, restored, and reused. This important effort is bringing people and businesses back to the Downtown and creating a momentum of change in Hamilton. The Jury applauds the renovation of this important historic façade facing Gore Park. With its limited budget, this project has done more with less, achieving excellent design results and a high impact adding another attractive destination in the Downtown. The design expertly blends new architectural elements with the old building fabric. The project enlivens the streetscape both during the day and at night bringing vitality to the Gore.  

Project Description
Gore Park is an important urban space in the heart of Hamilton's Downtown. This urban park required a comprehensive overhaul to better support community functions, attract more people, improve comfort and safety, upgrade functional systems, and reinvigorate the Gore. 

The Pedestrianization Initiative is the first of many planned phases identified by the Gore Park Master Plan for the revitalization of Gore Park. Through an extensive community engagement process, a single vision emerged for Gore Park that balanced the community's objectives for a meaningful and high quality public realm.

The Veterans' Place section of Gore Park is the first completed section of the pedestrian promenade, and involved relocating the heritage Cenotaph, creating an open lawn and a series of new memorial interpretive panels.

2015 UDAA Winner - Gore Park Pedestrianization Initiative and  Veteran’s Place

Recipients:

  • City of Hamilton, Public Works Department Landscape Architectural Services
  • City of Hamilton, Planning and Economic Development Tourism and Culture Division
  • Veteran’s Committee
  • MBTW Group
  • AECOM

Jury Comments
The Jury was unanimous in choosing this project for special recognition. As a collaborative effort between City departments, design disciplines and the community, this project is an exemplary accomplishment which showcases the fulfilment of several objectives.The project represents excellence in urban design, landscape architecture, park design, placemaking, and downtown revitalization. The Jury recognizes the superior design of the space and quality of its landscape features.

While only the Veteran’s Place phase is complete, the Jury can imagine the great impact that revitalization of the entire park will have on the face of Hamilton's Downtown. Investment of this high standard in the downtown represents a commitment by the City and the community at large in the recognition of the important value and benefits of a vibrant downtown.

Gore Park is a testament to the enduring value of great spaces and to the resilience and will of this community. The Jury congratulates the Gore Park design team on a job well done!

2015 People's Choice Award - David Braley Athletic and Recreation Centre at Mohawk College

Address: 135 Fennell Avenue West, Hamilton
Owner: Mohawk College
Design Team:

  • Perkins + Will Architects
  • IBI Group