Heritage Properties

Waterdown Village Built Heritage Inventory

 The Waterdown Inventory is an initiative to update the City of Hamilton’s database of information on heritage buildings in the village. The goal is to evaluate each property to determine if it has cultural heritage value or interest that should be recognized by adding it to the Municipal Heritage Register or further evaluated for potential designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

The Waterdown Inventory is being conducted in parallel with the Waterdown Community Node Secondary Plan and will help inform the Plan policies and the development of urban design guidelines that will guide future change and development in the village.

Virtual Open House

The Virtual Open house is now closed. You can still view the open house panels (PDF, 11 MB) and the preliminary evaluations and draft recommendations on the page below

If you still have questions or comments, please review the Frequently Asked Questions

Request more information about the Waterdown Village Built Heritage Inventory 

Understanding the History of the Village

To understand the origin, evolution and historic patterns that define Waterdown, research has been done to identify key milestones and themes that helped shape its settlement and village development. Seven major eras in the village’s history have been identified:

  • 7,500 BCE – 1660s: Indigenous Presence
  • 1660s – 1810s: Military Influence and Euro-Canadian Settlement
  • 1820s – 1860s: Mill Development and Village Establishment
  • 1870s – 1900s: Village Incorporation and Stability
  • 1910s – 1940s: A Time of Unrest and Great Change
  • 1950s – 1960s: Residential Intensification
  • 1970s – 2010s: Development, Amalgamation and Identity

Waterdown Village Historic Context Statement, Draft – August 2020 (PDF, 8.4 MB)

Want to learn more? View a story map outlining the history of the Village of Waterdown.

Preliminary Evaluations

Each property in the study area has been assigned a classification according to its contribution to the historic context of the village. The classification identifies properties that are historical, aesthetic or cultural landmarks of considerable heritage value (Significant Built Resources), as well as those whose heritage value lies primarily in the contribution they make to their historic context (Character-Defining Resources and Character-Supporting Resources).

Significant Built Resource (SBR) – the property is of considerable historic, aesthetic and / or contextual value; it is likely well known to local, regional or national communities.

Character-Defining Resource (CDR) – the property that strongly reinforces its historic context, clearly reflecting a characteristic pattern of development or activity, property type or attribute of the area.

Character-Supporting Resource (CSR) – the property maintains or supports its historic context and can be related to a characteristic pattern of development or activity, property type or attribute of the area.

Inventoried Property (IP) – the property is not currently considered to contribute to its historic context but could acquire value in the future, or the property has been heavily modified to the point that its heritage value may have been lost. Cultural heritage value may be identified through further research or detailed field investigation.

Draft Recommendations

The map below shows the draft recommendations based on the preliminary property evaluations and classifications.

Study Area: Includes the Waterdown Community Node Secondary Plan area and the historic boundaries of the Village of Waterdown, generally described as Lots 6 and 7 of Concession 3 of the former East Flamborough Township.

 

Cultural Heritage Assessments have been drafted for properties identified as candidates for designation and that are on the City’s work plan for designation.

  • Spring 2018: Project launch
  • Summer 2018: Property surveys
  • Fall 2018: Research and community interviews
  • Summer 2019: Community outreach (see Consultation Summary under Public Consultation)
  • Summer-Fall 2019: Preliminary evaluations
  • Fall 2019: Community workshop (public meeting #1)
  • Late Summer 2020: Owner and public engagement on recommendations (public meeting #2)
  • Fall 2020: Final recommendations to Heritage Committee and Council

Virtual Open House
August 24 to September 21, 2020
Open House Panels (PDF, 11 MB)

Online Survey
February 2019 to November 2019
Public feedback report (PDF, 491 KB)

Community Workshop
Held October 10, 2019
Introduced several studies happening in the Waterdown Community.
Display panels (PDF, 2 MB) | Workshop activity panels (PDF, 6 MB) | Feedback word cloud – What does Victorian Village mean to you? (PDF, 126 KB)

Consultation summary

Focus Group Meetings:

Stakeholder Meetings:

  • March 25, 2019 - Waterdown Mill Street Heritage Committee - Meeting 1 summary (PDF, 38 KB)
  • April 15, 2019 - Mary Hopkins Elementary School Parent Council - Meeting 2 summary (PDF, 51 KB)
  • April 23, 2019 - Waterdown Business Improvement Area Council - Meeting 3 summary (PDF, 41 KB)
  • May 21, 2019 - Waterdown District High School Parent Council - Meeting 4 summary (PDF, 95 KB)
  • June 3, 2019 - Waterdown Seniors Centre - Meeting 5 summary (PDF, 45 KB)

Pop-up events:

  • June 3, 2019 - Waterdown Public Library - Event summary (PDF, 51 KB)
  • June 29, 2019 - Waterdown Ribfest - Event summary (PDF, 41 KB)

What is the Waterdown Inventory project?
The Waterdown Inventory was an initiative to update the City of Hamilton’s database of information on heritage buildings in the village. The goal was to evaluate each property in the village to determine if it has cultural heritage value or interest that should be recognized by adding it to the Municipal Heritage Register or further evaluated for potential designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

The Waterdown Inventory was conducted in parallel with the Waterdown Community Node Secondary Plan and will help inform the Plan policies and the development of urban design guidelines that will guide future change and development in the village.

What was the study area?
The Waterdown Inventory study area included the Waterdown Community Node Secondary Plan area and the historic boundaries of the Village of Waterdown, generally bounded by Mountain Brow Road, First Street, Parkside Drive and Hamilton Street.

What was the project timeline?
This project was launched in Spring 2018 with research and survey work completed that summer and fall. Meetings with key community stakeholders and groups were held during the spring and summer of 2019 and a community workshop was held that fall.

Staff took the feedback received from the public and key stakeholders to finalize the property evaluations and draft listings in late 2019 and early 2020. The project is now in the final phase, engaging with property owners and the public in late-summer 2020. The goal is to finalize the recommendations and present them to the Municipal Heritage Committee and Council for their consideration before the end of 2020.

How do you determine if a property has cultural heritage value or interest?
Research was done to understand the origin, evolution and historic patterns that define Waterdown and an Historic Context Statement was drafted that identifies key milestones and themes that helped shape settlement and development in the village.

The heritage value of each property was evaluated and classified based on its contribution to the historic character of the village. The City’s classification framework is based on provincial criteria for determining cultural heritage value or interest (Ontario Regulation 9/06) and was designed to identify:

Properties that are historical, aesthetic or cultural landmarks of considerable heritage value (Significant Built Resources); and,
Properties whose heritage value lies primarily in the contribution they make to their historic context (Character-Defining Resources and Character-Supporting Resources).

What are the final recommendations of the Waterdown Inventory project?
All properties identified as Significant Built Resources, Character-Defining Resources and Character-Supporting Resources are being recommended for listing on the Register. In total, 230 properties are being recommended for listing on the Register in the Waterdown Inventory study area.

All properties identified as Significant Built Resources are also candidates for potential designation. 11 properties have been identified as candidates for designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

A virtual public open house was held from August 25, 2020 to September 21, 2020 to consult with property owners affected by these recommendations.

The open house panels, draft recommendations, property evaluations and classifications are available online at: www.hamilton.ca/heritageinventory.

How do I get involved or provide feedback?
Visit hamilton.ca/heritageinventory for more information, to fill out the feedback form and join our project e-mailing list.

Contact staff directly with any questions or comments:
Alissa Golden, Heritage Project Specialist
Tourism and Culture Division, City of Hamilton
Phone:
905-546-2424 ext. 4654
E-mail: [email protected]

What is the Inventory?
The Inventory is a compilation of over 25 years of data on buildings identified as having heritage value or interest. There are no legal restrictions imposed on property through listing on the Inventory. Inventoried properties are not subject to Heritage Permits. There are over 6,700 addresses listed on the Inventory city-wide, and approximately 680 of those are in the Waterdown Inventory study area.

What is the Municipal Heritage Register?
The Municipal Heritage Register is an administrative record of properties of heritage value or interest across the City of Hamilton. Listing on the Register is a way to recognize a property’s heritage value or interest to a community.

From a property owner’s perspective, listing on the Register does not prevent you from making changes or constructing additions to the existing home, nor would it require any additional heritage approvals (like heritage permits) to do so as part of the regular Building Permit process.

The main intent of listing is to flag properties of heritage interest and to promote their conservation and retention and, legally, this only comes into play if someone was looking to completely demolish a building. An owner of a listed property is required to give 60-days notice to the City of their intention to demolish or remove a building or structure on their property. Even then, listing on the Register would not prevent demolition, just delay it to allow for discussions about alternatives to demolition.

It requires consultation with our Hamilton Municipal Heritage Committee and a Council resolution to include (or remove) a non-designated property on the Register. There are over 1,500 non-designated properties on the Register, 13 of which are in the Waterdown Inventory study area.

What is heritage designation?
A designated property is a significant heritage resource protected by a municipal by-law that identifies why the property has value and what features contribute to its value. Designation does not prevent change, but it allows the City to manage physical changes to a property through the Heritage Permit process. Designated properties are also eligible for City grants and loans to assist with their maintenance, restoration and adaptive reuse.

There are over 600 designated properties in the City of Hamilton. Waterdown has 121 designated properties, most of which are in the Mill Street Heritage Conservation District.

What if I want to oppose the recommendation for my property?
Public education and owner consultation are key components of this project. Staff are available to answer any questions or concerns you might have about the draft recommendations for your property.

The Ontario Heritage Act does not require owner consent or notification prior to listing a property on the Register and it is ultimately Council’s decision what is listed, after consultation with its heritage committee.

However, the local Ward Councillor will be made aware of any owner opposition and written opposition letters will be included in the final staff report considered by Council later this year.

Please contact staff to discuss further and for instructions on providing written opposition to the draft recommendation for your property:

Alissa Golden, Heritage Project Specialist
Tourism and Culture Division, City of Hamilton
Phone: 905-546-2424 ext. 4654
E-mail: [email protected]

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