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Notice of Intention to Designate 828 Sanatorium Road, Hamilton (Mountain Sanatorium Brow Site)

The City of Hamilton intends to designate 828 Sanatorium Road, Hamilton, under Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, as being a property of cultural heritage value.

The property located at 828 Sanatorium Road, Hamilton has cultural heritage value as one of the campuses of the original Mountain Sanatorium (“the San”), Hamilton’s tuberculosis hospital, which originally opened in 1906. “The San” was Canada’s fourth sanatorium and, by 1932, one of the largest in the British Empire.

The Brow site was primarily purposed towards the treatment of First World War veterans who contracted tuberculosis while serving overseas. The property formerly contained six major buildings and a number of ancillary structures, most of which have been demolished. The only building that remains on site is the Long & Bisby Building (1920) which was built as a residence for nurses. Built with funds bestowed by the original donors of the Sanatorium lands, W.D. Long and G.H. Bisby, the Long & Bisby Building is a representative example of Edwardian Classical architecture. The site later evolved to become part of Chedoke Hospital and was known locally as the “Chedoke Browlands”.

An important element of the remnant landscape is the Cross of Lorraine. The Cross was erected by the well-known advertisment firm E.L. Ruddy Company in November of 1953 and stands as a tangible reminder of the former use of the property as a Sanatorium and the wider struggle to contain and eradicate Tuberculosis. The Cross is considered to be a local landmark.

Description of Historic Place

The former Mountain Sanatorium Brow Campus (later Chedoke Browlands) is located at the northern terminus of Sanatorium Road which bisects the property along Chedoke Creek. The property is bounded by the Niagara Escarpment to the north and Scenic Drive curving to the south, forming a semi-circular layout. The property includes remnants of the former institution, including the Long & Bisby Building and the Cross of Lorraine. The property is addressed as 828 Sanatorium Road, Hamilton (alternatively 870 Scenic Drive).

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest

The property located at 828 Sanatorium Road, Hamilton has cultural heritage value as one of the campuses of the original Mountain Sanatorium (“the San”), Hamilton’s tuberculosis hospital which originally opened in 1906. “The San” was Canada’s fourth sanatorium and, by 1932, one of the largest in the British Empire.

The Brow site was primarily purposed towards the treatment of First World War veterans who contracted tuberculosis while serving overseas. The property formerly contained six major buildings and a number of ancillary structures, most of which have been demolished. The only building that remains on site is the Long & Bisby Building (1920) which was built as a residence for nurses. Built with funds bestowed by the original donors of the Sanatorium lands, W.D. Long and G.H. Bisby, the Long & Bisby Building is a representative example of Edwardian Classical architecture. The site later evolved to become part of Chedoke Hospital and was known locally as the “Chedoke Browlands”.

The Cross of Lorraine, a local landmark, was erected by the well-known designer and advertiser E.L. Ruddy Company in November of 1953 and stands as a tangible reminder of the former use of the property as a Sanatorium and the wider struggle to contain and eradicate Tuberculosis. The Cross is 7.62 m (25 feet) tall, constructed of metal and includes neon lights for illumination. When lit, the Cross is noted to be clearly visible from the City and bay below the escarptment.

The heritage attributes of the property at 828 Sanatorium Road, Hamilton that display its cultural heritage value include:

The Long & Bisby Building:

  • Its location in an open, park-like setting and adjacent to a woodlot;
  • All exterior elevations and additions;
  • Roof profile and roofline;
  • Entrance portico including:
    • Paired, Corinthian-inspired columns;
    • Simple cornice brackets; and,
    • Low metal railing.
  • Decorative entrance including:
    • Doorway;
    • Webbed fanlight;
    • Sidelights; and,
    • Brick voussoir.
  • Eight-bay buff brick façade with projecting ends;
    • Brick parapet including:
    • Lower frieze board;
    • Stone finial accent; and,
    • Inset stone block.
  • All windows, window openings, stone sills, and side trim brick headers.
  • The Cross of Lorraine and it’s highly visible location along the edge of the Niagara Escarpment.

The full Statement of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest, Description of Heritage Attributes and supporting Cultural Heritage Assessment may also be viewed at the Office of the City Clerk, 71 Main Street West, 1st Floor, Hamilton, Ontario, during regular business hours.

Written Notice of Objection

Any person may, within 30 days after the date of the publication of the Notice, serve written notice of their objections to the proposed designation, together with a statement for the objection and relevant facts.

Dated at Hamilton, this 17th day of December, 2020.

Andrea Holland
City Clerk
Hamilton, Ontario

Contact: David Addington, Cultural Heritage Planner, Phone: 905-546-2424 ext. 1214, Email: [email protected]